Doors In High Exposure Areas — Best Practices

Best Practices

Best Practices For Doors starts with quality….

Living in the Pacific Northwest, we are faced with a lot of rain.

Here are a few ways Versatile combats the water during the build process, to keep your doors in great shape.

Quality materials are a must! We always use high quality, solid wood. The materials used will play a large role in the longevity of your door.

Most commercially manufactured doors are made up of many pieces of wood joined together. A veneer is then added to the exterior to give it the look of a solid piece of wood. At Versatile Wood Products, each piece of wood is hand-selected so our doors can be made by single, double or triple laminating, without a veneer.

To ensure that the door is completely sealed, Versatile provides a full gluing of all joinery.

Best Practices

…and technique

All doors go through the wet glazing technique, with neutral-cure silicone, instead of the dry glazing technique, which uses rubber gaskets. The benefit of wet glazing is that the seal is less prone to shrinkage and cracking.

To greatly reduce air and water infiltration, Versatile uses silicone bulb weather-stripping. This is preferred to foam filled, vinyl coated compression weather-stripping as it has superior durability and air sealing. Silicone bulb is also smaller and essentially hidden in the tight spaces that we have on custom doors.

In addition to the materials of the door, an entryway overhang can have a large impact on the longevity of your door.

Best Practices for doors: entryway overhang

The height and depth of an overhang matter. The deeper the overhang, the more protection your door will get. Depending on the direction your door faces, the distance of the overhang should be at least half of the height of the door.

Best Practices

Best Practices for doors: Water management

Water management is also important. Keeping water away from problem areas, such as the sill, framework, and top of the door is a must.

Best Practices

Using a traditional threshold, where the sill has a slope, or bevel, is the ideal way to drain water away from the framework.

Best Practices for doors: positive wash

Another key thing is to provide a positive wash (having no flat surfaces for water to pool on), this will ensure a lifespan of 15-20 years. For a door exposed to water, the sill should be at a slope of at least 10 degrees. All other flat areas should be beveled to avoid having water collect on the door.

As the top of the door is also susceptible to water damage, an in-swing door is preferred in high exposure areas to provide extra protection to this vulnerable area.

Best Practices

For taller than normal doors of eight feet or more, a multi-point (3 or 5 point) locking mechanism is recommended. This will provide additional sealing points against air and water infiltration and reduce warping and bowing of the door.

Best Practices

 

Best Practices for doors: laminated glass

For doors with glass that are exposed to the elements, Versatile sometimes uses laminated glass. As illustrated below, laminated glass is two panes of glass with a polyvinyl butyral (PVB) inter-layer. Using laminated glass will decrease the chances of breaking or cracking in stormy conditions.

 

Best Practices

Best Practices for doors: the finishing touch

Think about how you will finish your door. Clear and stain finishes will require more maintenance than a painted door; the door will need to be refinished more often than if it were painted. If it is in constant sun, the wood is more likely to fade when finished with a clear coat or stain.

Best Practices

Water management and quality materials are key to keeping your door beautiful for years to come. Ready to create your own durable and beautiful entry system? For more information and to begin a quote, contact Alex MacKenzie, quotes@versatilewp.com.

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